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Dear Visitor,

Below is a list of new development projects in San Francisco.

When visiting these buildings for the first time, it is best to be accompanied by an agent. If you are not, the building’s sales department will likely ask you to sign a document waiving your right to representation before they allow you to view the units.

If you wish to be represented in the transaction, please contact me. Purchasing a home is typically the largest and most complicated financial transaction in one’s life and the assistance of a trusted local real estate agent who will exhibit the utmost degree of care and professionalism is instrumental in meeting you high expectations and goals.

 

San Francisco Association of Realtors distinguishes the following San Francisco neighborhoods:

  • Alamo Square
  • Anza Vista
  • Balboa Terrace
  • Bayview
  • Bayview Heights
  • Bernal Heights
  • Buena Vista – Ashbury Heights
  • Candlestick Point
  • Central Richmond
  • Central Sunset
  • Central Waterfront – Dogpatch
  • Clarendon Heights
  • Cole Valley – Parnassus Heights
  • Corona Heights
  • Cow Hollow
  • Crocker Amazon
  • Diamond Heights
  • Downtown San Francisco
  • Duboce Triangle
  • Eureka Valley – Dolores Heights
  • Excelsior
  • Financial District – Barbary Coast
  • Forest Hill
  • Forest Hill Extension
  • Forest Knolls
  • Glen Park
  • Golden Gate Heights
  • Haight Ashbury
  • Hayes Valley
  • Hunters Point
  • Ingleside
  • Ingleside Terrace
  • Inner Mission
  • Inner Parkside
  • Inner Richmond
  • Inner Sunset
  • Jordan Park – Laurel Heights
  • Lake Shore
  • Lakeside
  • Lake Street
  • Little Hollywood
  • Lone Mountain
  • Lower Pacific Heights
  • Marina Merced Heights
  • Merced Manor
  • Midtown Terrace
  • Miraloma Park
  • Mission Bay
  • Mission Dolores
  • Mission Terrace
  • Monterey Heights
  • Mount Davidson
  • Manor Nob Hill
  • Noe Valley
  • North Beach
  • North Panhandle
  • North Waterfront
  • Oceanview
  • Outer Mission
  • Outer Parkside
  • Outer Richmond
  • Outer Sunset
  • Pacific Heights
  • Parkside
  • Pine Lake
  • Park Portola
  • Potrero Hill
  • Presidio Heights
  • Russian Hill
  • Saint Francis Wood
  • Sea Cliff
  • Sherwood Forest
  • Silver Terrace
  • South Beach
  • South of Market
  • Stonestown
  • Sunnyside
  • Telegraph Hill
  • Tenderloin
  • Twin Peaks
  • Van Ness – Civic Center
  • Visitation Valley
  • Western Addition
  • West Portal
  • Westwood Highlands
  • Westwood Park
  • Yerba Buena

Courtesy of http://www.sfrealtors.com/US/Neighborhood/CA/San-Francisco.html

For further details on some of the characteristic neighborhoods of San Francisco, please refer to the “About San Francisco / Neighborhoods / Key Neighborhoods” tab of this website.

San Francisco, a small city of approximately seven by seven miles, continuously ranks among the most expensive residential real estate markets in the United States and globally.

The city is one of the top destinations in the world for many reasons. Its unique characteristics such as natural beauty, eclectic Victorian and modern architecture, bustling entertainment and restaurant scenes as well as a diverse cultural mix attract tourists and new residents. San Francisco is the world’s capital for high-tech, biotechnology and medical research industries and is also a principal banking and finance center. It is home to the University of California, San Francisco (dedicated to graduate education in health and biomedical sciences), University of California, Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco State University, the City College of San Francisco and the University of San Francisco. The nearby renowned Stanford University and University of California, Berkeley add to the picture. These components make the city a magnet for smart, educated and ambitious people from all over the world who are willing to pay a premium to live here.

Several more factors contribute to the competitiveness of the city’s real estate market.

For the past several years, San Francisco’s population was increasing by approximately 10,000 new residents annually with new home construction not even remotely matching the increased demand. While new construction is booming again today, it is generally limited to the very expensive, luxury projects with significant number of buyers being wealthy individuals (often from overseas) purchasing second or third homes or units as investments.

San Francisco’s historically low unemployment combined with impressive new employment growth with many jobs being very well paid also affect the market. The so-called “Google bus” phenomenon with many people working in Silicon Valley but preferring to live in the city also plays its role. In addition, a large number of newly wealthy individuals have been created in the Bay area as a result of IPOs, company sales and stock options.

The city’s extremely high rents constantly place San Francisco among the most expensive (if not the most expensive) rental markets in the country (see, for instance, https://www.zumper.com/blog/2015/09/zumper-national-rent-report-september-2015/) which incentivizes home ownership with its multiple tax benefits and equity accrual. At the same time, existing homeowners often prefer to hold on to their properties instead of selling as they can receive substantial income from renting (Airbnb’s rent-to-tourists scenario is a contributing factor as well) with an option to return to their rapidly appreciating property when needed. This, combined with the fact that almost two thirds of San Francisco’s housing is in rental units (much of it under rent control and often not available for owner occupancy), further depresses the supply of new listings.

Non-San Francisco specific factors such as a surging stock market creating new and additional wealth as well as historically low interest rates increasing the affordability of housing further affect the situation.

This being said, real estate and financial markets are cyclical and the aforementioned factors do not guarantee an ever-appreciating housing. However, these factors are fundamental realities underpinning the city’s real estate market at the moment.

Today, buying or selling a home in San Francisco requires the savvy of a CEO. Rapid appreciation, neighborhood developments, complex transactional documents, landlord-tenant laws as well as other factors specific to the city’s housing stock make buying or selling a home here a challenging task at best. The assistance of a trusted real estate agent who exhibits the utmost degree of care and professionalism is instrumental in meeting clients’ high expectations and goals.

In the event you are interested in buying or selling your home in San Francisco or if you would like to learn more about the local real estate market, Kate Stanton is in the position to best assist you. A corporate attorney by background, licensed to practice law in California, New York and Russia, Kate obtained her California real estate broker's license in 2004. Kate holds an LL.M degree in Commercial Law from University of Cambridge, England (Queens’ College). As a corporate attorney with 10+ years of experience, Kate has worked with several Fortune 500 clients, managing complex transactions and corporate restructurings. She is known for her tenacity, negotiation skills and client service. Kate is fluent in English and Russian.

Kate has partnered with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage for its international reputation, extraordinary marketing presence and strong leadership. She chose the office in which Coldwell Banker was founded in 1906 at 1801 Lombard Street in San Francisco.

Coldwell Banker currently ranks as No. 1 real estate company in sales volume in Northern California outpacing its nearest competitor by a remarkable 375%. Its universal global presence with offices in 43 countries and territories around the world offers a truly international network, unmatched by local or regional specialty brokers. With an estimated 30% of California home buyers coming from outside the county they buy in – and an increasing number coming from out of state – it is important to collaborate with the company that provides connections beyond the local marketplace. In addition, Coldwell Banker’s affiliates offer mortgage, title, home warranty and relocation services, simplifying the real estate transaction and related issues.

The content of this page was partially derived from information by Paragon Group (http://www.paragon-re.com/) as well as: http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21677989-capital-disruption-fears-it-may-be-experiencing-too-much-golden-gates and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco

 

 

San Francisco is divided into ten Districts. Some of them encompass neighborhoods that are relatively homogeneous in general home values (such as Districts 5 and 7), and others contain neighborhoods of dramatically different values, such as District 8 which includes both Russian Hill and the Tenderloin.

 

District 1 (Northwest):  Sea Cliff, Lake Street, Richmond (Inner, Central, Outer), Jordan Park/Laurel Heights, and Lone Mountain. 

This District is commonly referred to as The Richmond District and is primarily a residential area situated between the Presidio and Golden Gate Parks. In close proximity to Ocean Beach, this District offers its residents a wide arrange of outdoor activities as well as several historic sites.

This area is considered by many as one of the most desired to live in San Francisco (several of its neighborhoods showcase some of the most expensive real estate in the City). The Lake Street and Sea Cliff neighborhoods are filled with Victorian and Edwardian mansions while Central and Outer Richmond display Marina style homes.

In addition to being an outlet for outdoor exploration, this vibrant District also offers a plethora of excellent restaurants and shops.

The average Walk Score is 97 and Transit Score is 76.

 

District 2 (West):  Sunset & Parkside (Inner, Central, Outer) and Golden Gate Heights.

More commonly known as the Sunset District and originally part of the "Outside Lands" District 2 is one of the foggiest districts in the City. Located alongside Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach, it has a small town feel while still being easily accessible to the more bustling parts of San Francisco.

Until after the construction of the Twin Peaks Tunnel in 1918, this District was largely undeveloped. Most of the buildings were constructed in the mid 1940's. While many of the residences appear similar on the outside, they often have significantly different interior architecture and design. The Rousseau architecture of the Sunset is noteworthy, combining French, Spanish, Tudor, and Mediterranean styles. 

The average Walk Score is 79 and Transit Score is 60.

 

District 3 (Southwest): Lake Shore, Lakeside, Merced Manor, Merced Heights, Ingleside, Ingleside Heights and Oceanview.

The Southwest District was one of the last areas to be developed in the City. It now houses The San Francisco Zoo, The San Francisco State University Campus, Lake Merced, the San Francisco Golf Club, the Lake Merced Golf Club, and Stonestown Galleria Mall.

Many of the buildings within this District are smaller residential properties built before the 1940's. With easy access to Freeways 1 and 280, and relatively affordable, this area attracted many middle class families.

District 3 has a lot to offer to someone looking for a friendly, family-oriented atmosphere. With its lakes, the Zoo and shopping, Southwest is a great little corner of the big city.

The average Walk Score is 81 and Transit Score is 59.

 

District 4 (Central Southwest):  St. Francis Wood, Forest Hill, West Portal, Forest Knolls, Diamond Heights, Midtown Terrace, Miraloma Park, Sunnyside, Balboa Terrace, Ingleside Terrace, Mt. Davidson Manor, Sherwood Forest, Monterey Heights and Westwood Highlands.

Also known as Twin Peaks West, District 4 is arguably one of the most upscale districts in San Francisco. Some of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the city, including St. Francis Wood, Forrest Hill, and Balboa Terrace are located here. Tucked between these neighborhoods, one will also find more family-friendly areas like Ingleside Terrace, Sunnyside, and Diamond Heights

A primarily residential district, District 4 was one of the last parts of San Francisco to be developed following the construction of the Twin Peaks Tunnel in 1918. It encompasses a large number of neighborhoods, with a wide array of homes from Midcentury Modern, to Italian Villas, and everything in between. This area is highly competitive and homes can be expensive and difficult to come by. Some of the most well-known San Francisco architects have built here including Timothy Pflueger, Bernard Maybeck, John Galen Howard, Henry Gutterson, and Joseph Eichler.

The average Walk Score is 73 and Transit Score is 75.

 

District 5 (Central): Noe Valley, Eureka Valley/Dolores Heights (Castro, Liberty Hill), Cole Valley, Glen Park, Corona Heights, Clarendon Heights, Ashbury Heights, Buena Vista Park, Haight Ashbury, Duboce Triangle, Twin Peaks, Mission Dolores and Parnassus Heights.

This District is in many ways the heart of San Francisco and is home to some of the most colorful and diverse neighborhoods in the city.

Often referred to as the Central District, it encompasses demure residential areas such as Buena Vista Park, Clarendon Heights, Corona Heights, Noe Valley, Duboce Triangle, Twin Peaks, Parnassus-Ashbury Heights, Glen Park and Dolores Heights, and is known for being home to the famous Haight-Asbury, as well as the Castro.

This District’s rich, cultural area offers an assortment of architectural options, as well as commercial real estate. Whether you are looking to start a family or a band, you can find what you're looking for in District 5.

The average Walk Score is 90 and Transit Score is 83.

 

District 6 (Central North):  Hayes Valley, North of Panhandle (NOPA), Alamo Square, Western Addition, Anza Vista and Lower Pacific Heights.

Central North District is home to the world-famous “Painted Ladies”, six gorgeous Victorian homes that peek over the edge of Alamo Square Park and are arguably the most photographed site in San Francisco.

As this area survived San Francisco’s devastating 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire, its architecture is relatively untouched by time and boasts some of the city's finest original Victorian houses. Initially known as the "Western Addition", District 6 is vibrant and filled with shopping, restaurants, and some of the city's oldest homes. For a wide array of culture, delicious eats, and beautiful historic houses, District 6 is a wonderful place to call home.

The average Walk Score is 94 and Transit Score is 89.

 

District 7 (North): Pacific Heights, Presidio Heights, Cow Hollow and Marina.

Situated at the northernmost point of San Francisco, District 7 is one of the most desirable places to live in the Bay Area and is unquestionably one of the most expensive areas of the City. This fashionable part of San Francisco is home to exclusive historic properties, great shopping, restaurants and some of the most picturesque views of the City, making it an ideal place for the chic, stylish, and well to-do.

District 7 is also home to a number of parks including the former military airstrip Crissy Field, Fort Mason, home of SFMOMA's Artist Gallery and Marina Green, a 74-acre stretch of grass that has some of the best views in the city. Natural beauty and wildlife appear alongside some of this District’ spectacular homes.

The average Walk Score is 96 and Transit Score is 83.

 

District 8 (Northeast):  Russian Hill, Nob Hill, Telegraph Hill, North Beach, Financial District, North Waterfront, Downtown, Van Ness/ Civic Center and Tenderloin.

The Northeast District is famous for some of San Francisco's most well-known and iconic sights. Chinatown, Union Square, Coit Tower, and Fisherman's Wharf are just a few of the popular destinations found here.

Nob Hill is a serenely beautiful neighborhood with historic Victorian homes and immaculate streetscapes, many of San Francisco’s best hotels are located here as well. Russian Hill is one of the tallest in the City and is filled with a number of buildings designed by prominent architects including Willis Polk, Joseph Worcester, Joseph Eichler and Julia Morgan. North Beach is the city's Little Italy with a large number of restaurants, bars and music venues. It has also been home to many famous residents including Joe DiMaggio and Jack Kerouac. Established in 1848, San Francisco's Chinatown is the oldest in North America, and the largest Chinese community outside of Asia.

Unlike many other Districts, District 8’s neighborhoods vary in their appeal and value.

The average Walk Score is 98 and Transit Score is 100.

 

District 9 (East):  SoMa, South Beach, Mission Bay, Potrero Hill, Dogpatch, Bernal Heights, Inner Mission and Yerba Buena. 

This District is one of San Francisco's most promising, up-and-coming areas to invest in real estate. This is the largest district in San Francisco and many of its neighborhoods previously had a different character and are now being gentrified.

Most well-known within this district is AT&T Park, Home of the World Champion San Francisco Giants, the trendy nightclub and restaurant scene and the Mission District. It also has excellent public transit, and is the site of the Transbay Transit Terminal.

The average Walk Score is 90 and Transit Score is 78.

 

District 10 (Southeast): Bayview, Bayview Heights, Excelsior, Portola, Visitacion Valley, Silver Terrace, Mission Terrace, Crocker Amazon and Outer Mission. 

Seated in the Southeast corner of the city, District 10 is one of San Francisco's biggest areas for potential growth. Once home to navy ships, this largely industrial area has seen many changes over the years and is ready for continued development.

Southeast may be a great place for someone looking to invest in real estate, commercial property, or even buy their first home. Within District 10 are insular neighborhoods like Little Hollywood, The Outer Mission and The Excelsior.

The average Walk Score is 84 and Transit Score is 70.

For further details on neighborhoods of San Francisco, please refer to the “Real Estate / San Francisco Neighborhoods / Key Neighborhoods” section of this website.

 

San Francisco, a small city of approximately seven by seven miles, continuously ranks among the most expensive residential real estate markets in the United States and globally.

The city is one of the top destinations in the world for many reasons. Its unique characteristics such as natural beauty, eclectic Victorian and modern architecture, bustling entertainment and restaurant scenes as well as a diverse cultural mix attract tourists and new residents. San Francisco is the world’s capital for high-tech, biotechnology and medical research industries and is also a principal banking and finance center. It is home to the University of California, San Francisco (dedicated to graduate education in health and biomedical sciences), University of California, Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco State University, the City College of San Francisco and the University of San Francisco. The nearby renowned Stanford University and University of California, Berkeley add to the picture. These components make the city a magnet for smart, educated and ambitious people from all over the world who are willing to pay a premium to live here.

Several more factors contribute to the competitiveness of the city’s real estate market.

For the past several years, San Francisco’s population was increasing by approximately 10,000 new residents annually with new home construction not even remotely matching the increased demand. While new construction is booming again today, it is generally limited to the very expensive, luxury projects with significant number of buyers being wealthy individuals (often from overseas) purchasing second or third homes or units as investments.

San Francisco’s historically low unemployment combined with impressive new employment growth with many jobs being very well paid also affect the market. The so-called “Google bus” phenomenon with many people working in Silicon Valley but preferring to live in the city also plays its role. In addition, a large number of newly wealthy individuals have been created in the Bay area as a result of IPOs, company sales and stock options.

The city’s extremely high rents constantly place San Francisco among the most expensive (if not the most expensive) rental markets in the country (see, for instance, https://www.zumper.com/blog/2015/09/zumper-national-rent-report-september-2015/) which incentivizes home ownership with its multiple tax benefits and equity accrual. At the same time, existing homeowners often prefer to hold on to their properties instead of selling as they can receive substantial income from renting (Airbnb’s rent-to-tourists scenario is a contributing factor as well) with an option to return to their rapidly appreciating property when needed. This, combined with the fact that almost two thirds of San Francisco’s housing is in rental units (much of it under rent control and often not available for owner occupancy), further depresses the supply of new listings.

Non-San Francisco specific factors such as a surging stock market creating new and additional wealth as well as historically low interest rates increasing the affordability of housing further affect the situation.

This being said, real estate and financial markets are cyclical and the aforementioned factors do not guarantee an ever-appreciating housing. However, these factors are fundamental realities underpinning the city’s real estate market at the moment.

Today, purchasing a home in San Francisco requires deep knowledge of the local housing market as well as professional expertise. Rapid appreciation, neighborhood developments, complex transactional documents, landlord-tenant laws as well as other factors specific to the city’s housing stock make buying or selling a home here a challenging task at best. The assistance of a trusted real estate agent who exhibits the utmost degree of care and professionalism is instrumental in meeting clients’ high expectations and goals.

 

The second half of the 19th century produced what is now known as “Victorian” architecture. It was named after Queen Victoria of England (1837-1901), the leading figure of an age when Britain dominated the world and set the trend in social behavior, fashion, and architecture.

It was certainly not the style where less is more and was characterized by extensive ornamentation. It seemed that the bigger the house, the more excessive the embellishments. Both the Gothic-style Mark Hopkins’ mansion and the Second Empire-style chateau of Charles Crocker on Nob Hill, before they burned down in 1906, were noted for their extravagantly detailed exteriors and even became targets of ridicule. Local architect William Polk described Crocker house as being the product of “the delirium of a San Francisco’s distinctive Victorian architecture was prompted by the greed of the real estate developers who divided large parcels of raw land into lots just big enough to hold a house (typically 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep). This forced the architects to be more creative with their designs. One early distinctive feature that emerged was the bay window which gave the building not

As early as 1880s San Francisco was gaining a reputation for its colorful, even eccentric, Victorian architecture. The New York Times reporter described it as a “riotous run of architectural fancy”. Today, some of the best specimens can be found in the Western Addition.  

The Victorian homes of San Francisco can roughly be placed into one of four periods, each with its own prevailing style, although some houses are difficult to categorize since builders frequently mixed elements of different periods. These four styles are:

Cottage Style: 1850s-1860s

This style was modest with just a few rooms and simple adornment, usually fronted with the balcony or a porch, some of the more fancy ones have Gothic windows and rooftop finials;

The best examples can be found on Telegraph Hill, the eastern slope of which was spared by 1906 fire (see 200 block of Union Street as well as 31 Alta Street (constructed in 1852, it is one of the oldest houses in San Francisco; see also 228 Filbert Street (1873) as well as 220 Dolores (1852));

Italianate: 1870s 

This style incorporated the elements of Roman or Italian classical decoration, is characterized by straight roof lines and bracketed cornices. Early examples typically had flat fronts with later ones exhibiting slanted bay windows

The finest rows of Italianates are at 1818 California Street, Western Addition from 2115 to 2125 Bush Street (built in 1874) as well as 120 to 126 Guerrero Street

Stick: 1880s

This style, sometimes called Stick Eastlake (after Charles Eastlake, an English interior designer), is characterized by square bay windows, long ornamental strips of “sticks” affixed to the exterior, giving the façade a strong verticality. It reached its peak in popularity in 1880s;

One of the best examples of this style can be found at 1801 Block of Laguna Street between Bush and Pine (1889). A landmark

Queen Anne: 1890s

This style was named by a British architect for an earlier queen of England and abandoned its predecessor’s style of false gable roofs with functional gable roofs. Verticality of the Stick houses was replaced with horizontal ornamental designs, Queen Annes were also typically covered with decorative wooden shingles and a “witch’s cap” towers;

This style is no rare in San Francisco with only about 300 Queen Annes out of 15,000 Victorians remaining. The finest examples can be found at the Alamo Square (painted ladies, built in 1894-95). Haight-Ashbury also boasts some fine specimens on Masonic Avenue between Haight and Waller (built in 1899).

The content displayed above was created with the use of a book by Mr. Rand Richards: “Historic San Francisco. A concise history and guide.” 

For more detailed summaries regarding Victorian, Edwardian and post-1920s architecture of San Francisco, please refer to the charts shown in the corresponding tabs of this website provided courtesy of by Mr. James Dixon, Architect (http://www.jdarchitect.com/Site/About.html).

 

Originally founded in 1776 by Spanish colonists as a small settlement, San Francisco swelled in 1849 during the Gold Rush and continued to grow thereafter. Its diverse neighborhoods reflect the City’s landscape, history, demographics and have their unique characteristics, personality and often even different climate conditions.

There are more than fifty hills and over two hundred public parks within city limits. Some neighborhoods, such as Nob Hill, Russian Hill and Telegraph Hill bear the same name as a nearby hill, some are named after the prevailing demographics (Chinatown, Japantown), some denote the street location central to the area (Haight Ashbury, South of Market / SoMa) and so on. Entire neighborhoods such as the Marina, Mission Bay, and Hunter’s Point, as well as large sections of the Embarcadero, sit on areas of landfill.

For locals, San Francisco may feel like a congregation of small towns spread over its many hills and steep streets. For a city measuring just around forty nine square miles, it is remarkable that one can walk a short distance and pass through several completely different neighborhoods.

Despite significant devastation caused by the 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire, San Francisco pulled itself up and out of the rubble and has become one of the most desirable and richest cities in the world. Today, San Francisco has more than 140 neighborhoods by some counts – some of which are more about attitude than latitude.

For more details on San Francisco’s key neighborhoods, please refer to Real Estate / San Francisco Neighborhoods / Key Neighborhoods section of this website.

 

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Этот вебсайт предназначен для жителей и гостей Сан Франциско.

Наш город знаменит своим особенным климатом, живописной природой, разнообразным ландшафтом, эклектичной архитектурой, богатой культурной жизнью и либеральным духом. Сан Франциско также является одним из крупнейших финансовых и банковских центров и по сути мировой технологической столицей. Всемирно известные университеты (Стэнфорд, Беркли), а также знаменитая Силиконовая Долина (Silicon Valley) расположены поблизости и дополняют характер и культурную ткань города.

Приехав в Сан Франциско из России более десяти лет назад, я была очарована этим удивительным местом. В свободное время я увлеклась изучением богатой истории города (отчасти связанной с Россией), его разнообразной архитектурой и многочисленными районами, почти каждый из которых обладает индивидуальным характером, а зачастую и климатом (что обусловлено местной топографией). Проживая в одном из исторических районов, я также оказалась в центре насыщенной культурной жизни – для сравнительно небольшого города, Сан Франциско уникален по богатству культурных достопримечательностей, будь то музеи, галерии, театры, парки, кулинарная арена или ночная жизнь. Впоследствии в виде хобби я нередко выступала в качестве неофициального туристического гида для своих друзей и знакомых, которым было интересно побольше узнать о городе, его истории и культуре.

В дополнение к моему интересу к истории и участию в культурной жизни города, я также специализируюсь на продаже и покупке недвижимости в Сан Франциско. Ввиду ряда факторов (которые я анализирую в разделе Real Estate / Overview), Сан Франциско являтся одним из самых дорогих городов мира и рынок недвижимости здесь конкурентен и специфичен. Высокие цены, особенности городского планирования, своеобразность местных законодательных актов, разнообразный характер районов города (что зачастую существенно влияет на стоимость), а также сложность документального сопровождения и оформления сделок с недвижимостью требуют глубоких знаний местного рынка, искусных переговорных навыков и высокого профессионализма. То обстоятельство, что я аффилирована с международной брокерской компанией Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, основанной в Сан Франциско в 1906 году и являющейся бесспорным лидером по продажам в Калифорнии, позволяет мне иметь доступ к международной базе данных по недвижимости, великолепной маркетинговой платформе, а также информации об объектах, выставленных на рынок в частном порядке (вне системы MLS), что безусловно играет серьезную роль в успешной навигации сложного рынка Сан Франциско.

Моя цель как брокера по недвижимости заключается в предоставлении высокого уровня услуг, направленных на максимальное достижение целей и ожиданий моих клиентов. Мой образовательный уровень и профессиональная квалификация позволяют достичь этой цели. Изначально приехав в С.Ш.А. из Екатеринбурга в возрасте 15 лет в рамках финансировавшейся американским правительством программы по обмену школьниками Freedom Support Act (http://exchanges.state.gov/non-us/program/future-leaders-exchange), я продолжила свое образование в России, где в 2000 году я с отличием закончила Уральскую Государственную Юридическую Академию. Впоследствии я переехала в Сан Франциско, получила диплом магистра права (LL.M, U.S. Legal Studies, диплом с отличием) и стала адвокатом* с правом практики в штатах Калифорния (2003) и Нью-Йорк (2004). Я также являюсь стипедиатом (Cambridge Overseas Trust) и выпускницей Кэмбриджского университета (University of Cambridge, QueensCollege). В качестве адвоката специализировавшегося изначально на международных судебных и арбитражных разбирательствах, а впоследствии на корпоративном праве, на протяжении ряда лет я работала как с частными, так и с корпоративными клиентами (включая Fortune 500).

Я благодарю Вас за посещение www.sfbykate.com и надеюсь, что Вы найдете представленную здесь информацию полезной и интересной, будь то общие сведения о городе Сан Франциско, его истории, архитектуре, культурной жизни либо данные о местном рынке недвижимости и связанными с ним аспектами. В случае, если Вам или Вашим знакомым необходима помощь в покупке или продаже недвижимости, я буду рада оказать соответствующие услуги.

Всего наилучшего,

ЕКАТЕРИНА ("КЕЙТ") СТЭНТОН 

Associate Broker

CalBRE No: 01445813

1801 Lombard Street San Francisco, CA 94123

"The Founding Office"

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

+1.415.601.0926

 

*Просьба учесть, что на данном вебсайте я выступаю исключительно в качестве брокера по недвижимости и не намереваюсь предоставлять юридические консультации по каким-либо вопросам. Сфера моей спецификации как адвоката не включает и никогда не включала сделки с недвижимостью и связанными с ними аспектами. 

 

Originally founded in 1776 by Spanish colonists as a small settlement, San Francisco swelled in 1849 during the Gold Rush and continued to grow thereafter. Its diverse neighborhoods reflect the City’s landscape, history, demographics and have their unique characteristics, personality and often even different climate conditions.

There are more than fifty hills and over two hundred public parks within city limits. Some neighborhoods, such as Nob Hill, Russian Hill and Telegraph Hill bear the same name as a nearby hill, some are named after the prevailing demographics (Chinatown, Japantown), some denote the street location central to the area (Haight Ashbury, South of Market / SoMa) and so on. Entire neighborhoods such as the Marina, Mission Bay, and Hunter’s Point, as well as large sections of the Embarcadero, sit on areas of landfill.

For locals, San Francisco may feel like a congregation of small towns spread over its many hills and steep streets. For a city measuring just around forty nine square miles, it is remarkable that one can walk a short distance and pass through several completely different neighborhoods.

Despite significant devastation caused by the 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire, San Francisco pulled itself up and out of the rubble and has become one of the most desirable and richest cities in the world. Today, San Francisco has more than 140 neighborhoods by some counts – some of which are more about attitude than latitude.

San Francisco Districts

San Francisco is divided into ten Districts. Some of them encompass neighborhoods that are relatively homogeneous in general home values (such as Districts 5 and 7), and others contain neighborhoods of dramatically different values, such as District 8 which includes both Russian Hill and the Tenderloin.


District 1 (Northwest):
  Sea Cliff, Lake Street, Richmond (Inner, Central, Outer), Jordan Park/Laurel Heights, and Lone Mountain.

This District is commonly referred to as The Richmond District and is primarily a residential area situated between the Presidio and Golden Gate Parks. In close proximity to Ocean Beach, this District offers its residents a wide arrange of outdoor activities as well as several historic sites.

This area is considered by many as one of the most desired to live in San Francisco (several of its neighborhoods showcase some of the most expensive real estate in the City). The Lake Street and Sea Cliff neighborhoods are filled with Victorian and Edwardian mansions while Central and Outer Richmond display Marina style homes.

In addition to being an outlet for outdoor exploration, this vibrant District also offers a plethora of excellent restaurants and shops.

The average Walk Score is 97 and Transit Score is 76.

District 2 (West):  Sunset & Parkside (Inner, Central, Outer) and Golden Gate Heights.

More commonly known as the Sunset District and originally part of the "Outside Lands" District 2 is one of the foggiest districts in the City. Located alongside Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach, it has a small town feel while still being easily accessible to the more bustling parts of San Francisco.

Until after the construction of the Twin Peaks Tunnel in 1918, this District was largely undeveloped. Most of the buildings were constructed in the mid 1940's. While many of the residences appear similar on the outside, they often have significantly different interior architecture and design. The Rousseau architecture of the Sunset is noteworthy, combining French, Spanish, Tudor, and Mediterranean styles.

The average Walk Score is 79 and Transit Score is 60.

District 3 (Southwest): Lake Shore, Lakeside, Merced Manor, Merced Heights, Ingleside, Ingleside Heights and Oceanview.

The Southwest District was one of the last areas to be developed in the City. It now houses The San Francisco Zoo, The San Francisco State University Campus, Lake Merced, the San Francisco Golf Club, the Lake Merced Golf Club, and Stonestown Galleria Mall. 

Many of the buildings within this District are smaller residential properties built before the 1940's. With easy access to Freeways 1 and 280, and relatively affordable, this area attracted many middle class families.

District 3 has a lot to offer to someone looking for a friendly, family-oriented atmosphere. With its lakes, the Zoo and shopping, Southwest is a great little corner of the big city.

The average Walk Score is 81 and Transit Score is 59.

District 4 (Central Southwest):  St. Francis Wood, Forest Hill, West Portal, Forest Knolls, Diamond Heights, Midtown Terrace, Miraloma Park, Sunnyside, Balboa Terrace, Ingleside Terrace, Mt. Davidson Manor, Sherwood Forest, Monterey Heights and Westwood Highlands; 

Also known as Twin Peaks West, District 4 is arguably one of the most upscale districts in San Francisco. Some of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the city, including St. Francis Wood, Forrest Hill, and Balboa Terrace are located here. Tucked between these neighborhoods, one will also find more family-friendly areas like Ingleside Terrace, Sunnyside, and Diamond Heights.

A primarily residential district, District 4 was one of the last parts of San Francisco to be developed following the construction of the Twin Peaks Tunnel in 1918. It encompasses a large number of neighborhoods, with a wide array of homes from Midcentury Modern, to Italian Villas, and everything in between. This area is highly competitive and homes can be expensive and difficult to come by. Some of the most well-known San Francisco architects have built here including Timothy Pflueger, Bernard Maybeck, John Galen Howard, Henry Gutterson, and Joseph Eichler.

The average Walk Score is 73 and Transit Score is 75.

District 5 (Central): Noe Valley, Eureka Valley/Dolores Heights (Castro, Liberty Hill), Cole Valley, Glen Park, Corona Heights, Clarendon Heights, Ashbury Heights, Buena Vista Park, Haight Ashbury, Duboce Triangle, Twin Peaks, Mission Dolores and Parnassus Heights.

This District is in many ways the heart of San Francisco and is home to some of the most colorful and diverse neighborhoods in the city.

Often referred to as the Central District, it encompasses demure residential areas such as Buena Vista Park, Clarendon Heights, Corona Heights, Noe Valley, Duboce Triangle, Twin Peaks, Parnassus-Ashbury Heights, Glen Park and Dolores Heights, and is known for being home to the famous Haight-Asbury, as well as the Castro.

This District’s rich, cultural area offers an assortment of architectural options, as well as commercial real estate. Whether you are looking to start a family or a band, you can find what you're looking for in District 5.

The average Walk Score is 90 and Transit Score is 83.

District 6 (Central North):  Hayes Valley, North of Panhandle (NOPA), Alamo Square, Western Addition, Anza Vista and Lower Pacific Heights.

Central North District is home to the world-famous “Painted Ladies”, six gorgeous Victorian homes that peek over the edge of Alamo Square Park and are arguably the most photographed site in San Francisco.

As this area survived San Francisco’s devastating 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire, its architecture is relatively untouched by time and boasts some of the city's finest original Victorian houses. Initially known as the "Western Addition", District 6 is vibrant and filled with shopping, restaurants, and some of the city's oldest homes. For a wide array of culture, delicious eats, and beautiful historic houses, District 6 is a wonderful place to call home.

The average Walk Score is 94 and Transit Score is 89.

District 7 (North): Pacific Heights, Presidio Heights, Cow Hollow and Marina.

Situated at the northernmost point of San Francisco, District 7 is one of the most desirable places to live in the Bay Area and is unquestionably one of the most expensive areas of the City. This fashionable part of San Francisco is home to exclusive historic properties, great shopping, restaurants and some of the most picturesque views of the City, making it an ideal place for the chic, stylish, and well to-do.

District 7 is also home to a number of parks including the former military airstrip Crissy Field, Fort Mason, home of SFMOMA's Artist Gallery and Marina Green, a 74-acre stretch of grass that has some of the best views in the city. Natural beauty and wildlife appear alongside some of this District’ spectacular homes.

The average Walk Score is 96 and Transit Score is 83.

District 8 (Northeast):  Russian Hill, Nob Hill, Telegraph Hill, North Beach, Financial District, North Waterfront, Downtown, Van Ness/ Civic Center and Tenderloin.

The Northeast District is famous for some of San Francisco's most well-known and iconic sights. Chinatown, Union Square, Coit Tower, and Fisherman's Wharf are just a few of the popular destinations found here.

Nob Hill is a serenely beautiful neighborhood with historic Victorian homes and immaculate streetscapes, many of San Francisco’s best hotels are located here as well. Russian Hill is one of the tallest in the City and is filled with a number of buildings designed by prominent architects including Willis Polk, Joseph Worcester, Joseph Eichler and Julia Morgan. North Beach is the city's Little Italy with a large number of restaurants, bars and music venues. It has also been home to many famous residents including Joe DiMaggio and Jack Kerouac. Established in 1848, San Francisco's Chinatown is the oldest in North America, and the largest Chinese community outside of Asia.

Unlike many other Districts, District 8’s neighborhoods vary in their appeal and value.

The average Walk Score is 98 and Transit Score is 100.

District 9 (East):  SoMa, South Beach, Mission Bay, Potrero Hill, Dogpatch, Bernal Heights, Inner Mission and Yerba Buena. 

This District is one of San Francisco's most promising, up-and-coming areas to invest in real estate. This is the largest district in San Francisco and many of its neighborhoods previously had a different character and are now being gentrified.

Most well-known within this district is AT&T Park, Home of the World Champion San Francisco Giants, the trendy nightclub and restaurant scene and the Mission District. It also has excellent public transit, and is the site of the Transbay Transit Terminal.

The average Walk Score is 90 and Transit Score is 78.

District 10 (Southeast): Bayview, Bayview Heights, Excelsior, Portola, Visitacion Valley, Silver Terrace, Mission Terrace, Crocker Amazon and Outer Mission. 

Seated in the Southeast corner of the city, District 10 is one of San Francisco's biggest areas for potential growth. Once home to navy ships, this largely industrial area has seen many changes over the years and is ready for continued development.

Southeast may be a great place for someone looking to invest in real estate, commercial property, or even buy their first home. Within District 10 are insular neighborhoods like Little Hollywood, The Outer Mission and The Excelsior.

The average Walk Score is 84 and Transit Score is 70.

San Francisco Neighborhoods

San Francisco Association of Realtors distinguishes the following San Francisco neighborhoods:

  • Alamo Square
  • Anza Vista
  • Balboa Terrace
  • Bayview
  • Bayview Heights
  • Bernal Heights 
  • Buena Vista – Ashbury Heights 
  • Candlestick Point 
  • Central Richmond 
  • Central Sunset
  • Central Waterfront – Dogpatch
  • Clarendon Heights
  • Cole Valley – Parnassus Heights
  • Corona Heights
  • Cow Hollow
  • Crocker Amazon 
  • Diamond Heights
  • Downtown San Francisco
  • Duboce Triangle
  • Eureka Valley – Dolores Heights
  • Excelsior
  • Financial District – Barbary Coast
  • Forest Hill
  • Forest Hill Extension
  • Forest Knolls
  • Glen Park
  • Golden Gate Heights
  • Haight Ashbury
  • Hayes Valley
  • Hunters Point
  • Ingleside
  • Ingleside Terrace
  • Inner Mission
  • Inner Parkside
  • Inner Richmond
  • Inner Sunset
  • Jordan Park – Laurel Heights
  • Lake Shore
  • Lakeside
  • Lake Street
  • Little Hollywood
  • Lone Mountain
  • Lower Pacific Heights
  • Marina
  • Merced Heights
  • Merced Manor
  • Midtown Terrace
  • Miraloma Park
  • Mission Bay
  • Mission Dolores
  • Mission Terrace
  • Monterey Heights
  • Mount Davidson Manor
  • Nob Hill
  • Noe Valley
  • North Beach
  • North Panhandle
  • North Waterfront
  • Oceanview
  • Outer Mission
  • Outer Parkside
  • Outer Richmond
  • Outer Sunset
  • Pacific Heights
  • Parkside
  • Pine Lake Park
  • Portola
  • Potrero Hill
  • Presidio Heights
  • Russian Hill
  • Saint Francis Wood
  • Sea Cliff
  • Sherwood Forest
  • Silver Terrace
  • South Beach
  • South of Market
  • Stonestown
  • Sunnyside
  • Telegraph Hill
  • Tenderloin
  • Twin Peaks
  • Van Ness – Civic Center
  • Visitation Valley
  • Western Addition
  • West Portal
  • Westwood Highlands
  • Westwood Park
  • Yerba Buena

 

For further information on San Francisco’s key neighborhoods, please refer to “Real Estate / Neighborhoods / Key Neighborhoods” section of this website.

 

The content displayed above was partially derived from http://www.sfrealtors.com/US/Neighborhood/CA/San-Francisco.html

 

 

One of the most famous phrases about San Francisco’s weather - “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco." - is incorrectly attributed to Mark Twain. Searches of Twain writings, private letters, and other publications fail to locate it. The closest resemblance to it appears in an 1879 letter in which Twain quoted a person who, when asked if he'd ever seen such a cold winter, replied, "Yes, last summer." Twain then added his own comment, "I judge he spent his summer in Paris."

In fact, San Francisco weather is rather temperate with mild winters and dry summers. The city lays in an area of diversified topography which creates numerous microclimates within its boundaries. Winds are channeled over and around San Francisco by the terrain, resulting in significant differences in the weather across relatively small areas.  

The highest terrain is toward the south, where the elevations rise to over 900 feet, with Mount Davidson's peak of 938 feet the tallest, followed closely by Mount Sutro at 920 feet and both North and South Twin at 919 feet. In addition to the primary north- northwest to south-southeast ridgeline, a number of significant hills dominate the San Francisco horizon.

San Francisco's climate is further modified by the location of the City on the northern end of a peninsula, surrounded on three sides by the relatively cool waters of the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. In addition to the normal cool temperatures of the mid-latitude Pacific Ocean, the water temperatures are modified by the upwelling of cold water along the California coast. This phenomenon is caused by the persistence of the Pacific High and the northwest winds that are constrained by the Coast Range to blow parallel to the coastline. The effects of these winds cause a net transport of surface waters away from the shore. Consequently, as the surface waters drift away from the coast, they are replaced by the upwelling of colder waters from below.

Summertime in San Francisco is characterized by cool marine air and persistent coastal stratus and fog, with average maximum temperatures between 60F and 70F, and minimal between 50F and 55F. The mornings will typically find the entire city overcast followed by clearing on the warmer bay side, but only partial clearing on the cooler ocean side.

Rainfall from May through September is relatively rare, with an aggregate of only about 5 percent of the yearly average total of approximately 21.5 inches. Off-season rains which do occur are usually the result of weak early or late season occluded fronts, or surges of subtropical moisture from the south that result in brief showers or thundershowers spreading into the area. Over 80 percent of San Francisco's seasonal rain falls between November and March, occurring over about 10 days per month. Winter rains on the California coast are primarily due to occluded fronts on a trajectory from the west-northwest, and an occasional cold front from the Gulf of Alaska.

Winter temperatures in San Francisco are quite temperate, with highs between 55F and 60F and lows in the 45F to 50F range. The main source region of wintertime fog in San Francisco is the Great Valley. Snow is extremely rare, with only 10 documented instances of measurable snow at the official observing site in the past 143 seasons.

Spring and fall are transition periods for San Francisco. These seasons usually produce the most cloud-free and hot days when high pressure builds into the Pacific Northwest and Great Basin, and dry offshore winds replace the Pacific sea breeze.

The content displayed above was partially derived from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco.

This website is about the beautiful City of San Francisco, its history, architecture, neighborhoods and everyday life.

As a long-term resident of the City who enjoys and participates in its diverse cultural and social scene, Kate is intimately familiar with San Francisco’s past and present be it a theater premier or gallery opening, launch of a new cool restaurant or a music venue, or changes in city planning and development.

Kate studied Law in the Ural State Law Academy (Ekaterinburg, Russia), Golden Gate University (San Francisco, CA) and Queens’ College (University of Cambridge, UK). She is a corporate attorney licensed in California, New York and Russia with 12+ years of experience of serving several Fortune 500 clients.

Kate is also a California real estate broker. She has partnered with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage for its international reputation, global presence, extraordinary marketing platform and unquestionable leadership in California real estate sales.

San Francisco’s real estate market is challenging at best and requires local market knowledge, excellent negotiation skills and client service. With her professional background, Kate is well equipped to assist in selling or buying real estate in San Francisco and beyond as well as relocation - her mission as a broker is to bring the highest degree of professionalism, care and negotiation skills to her clients.

Whether you are interested in what is on tonight in the City and/or you need a local real estate resource, Kate will be happy to assist.

 

Cottage Style: 1850s-1860s

This style was modest with just a few rooms and simple adornment, usually fronted with the balcony or a porch, some of the more fancy ones have Gothic windows and rooftop finials.

The best examples can be found on Telegraph Hill, the eastern slope of which was spared by 1906 fire (see 200 block of Union Street as well as 31 Alta Street (constructed in 1852, it is one of the oldest houses in San Francisco; see also 228 Filbert Street (1873) as well as 220 Dolores (1852)).

Italianate: 1870s

This style incorporated the elements of Roman or Italian classical decoration, is characterized by straight roof lines and bracketed cornices. Early examples typically had flat fronts with later ones exhibiting slanted bay windows.

The finest rows of Italianates are at 1818 California Street, Western Addition from 2115 to 2125 Bush Street (built in 1874) as well as 120 to 126 Guerrero Street. 

Stick: 1880s

This style, sometimes called Stick Eastlake (after Charles Eastlake, an English interior designer), is characterized by square bay windows, long ornamental strips of “sticks” affixed to the exterior, giving the façade a strong verticality. It reached its peak in popularity in 1880s.

One of the best examples of this style can be found at 1801 Block of Laguna Street between Bush and Pine (1889). A landmark example is at the corner of Scott and Fulton Streets (Alamo Square), built in 1889.

Queen Anne: 1890s

This style was named by a British architect for an earlier queen of England and abandoned its predecessor’s style of false gable roofs with functional gable roofs. Verticality of the Stick houses was replaced with horizontal ornamental designs, Queen Annes were also typically covered with decorative wooden shingles and a “witch’s cap” towers.

This style is no rare in San Francisco with only about 300 Queen Annes out of 15,000 Victorians remaining. The finest examples can be found at the Alamo Square (painted ladies, built in 1894-95). Haight-Ashbury also boasts some fine specimens on Masonic Avenue between Haight and Waller (built in 1899). 

For more detailed summaries regarding Victorian, Edwardian and post-1920s architecture of San Francisco, please refer to the charts shown in the corresponding tabs of this website provided courtesy of by Mr. James Dixon, Architect (http://www.jdarchitect.com/Site/About.html).

 

The second half of the 19th century produced what is now known as “Victorian” architecture. It was named after Queen Victoria of England (1837-1901), the leading figure of an age when Britain dominated the world and set the trend in social behavior, fashion, and architecture. 

It was certainly not the style where less is more and was characterized by extensive ornamentation. It seemed that the bigger the house, the more excessive the embellishments. Both the Gothic-style Mark Hopkins’ mansion and the Second Empire-style chateau of Charles Crocker on Nob Hill, before they burned down in 1906, were noted for their extravagantly detailed exteriors and even became targets of ridicule. Local architect William Polk described Crocker house as being the product of “the delirium of a woodcarver”.

San Francisco’s distinctive Victorian architecture was prompted by the greed of the real estate developers who divided large parcels of raw land into lots just big enough to hold a house (typically 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep). This forced the architects to be more creative with their designs. One early distinctive feature that emerged was the bay window which gave the building not only more floor space but also increased the available light and ventilation as well as an additional room for exterior decoration.

As early as 1880s San Francisco was gaining a reputation for its colorful, even eccentric, Victorian architecture. The New York Times reporter described it as a “riotous run of architectural fancy”. Today, some of the best specimens can be found in the Western Addition.  

The Victorian homes of San Francisco can roughly be placed into one of four periods, each with its own prevailing style, although some houses are difficult to categorize since builders frequently mixed elements of different periods.

 

Information displayed below was derived from the book by Rand Richards: Historic San Francisco. A Concise History and Guide.

 

Overview

San Francisco is a city in northern California, located at the north end of the San Francisco Peninsula surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. It is known for its diverse and open-minded cultural scene, hilly landscape, year-round fog, iconic views, cable cars and colorful Victorian houses.

San Francisco has several nicknames, including "The City by the Bay", "Fog City", "San Fran", and "Frisco", as well as antiquated ones like "The City that Knows How," "Baghdad by the Bay," and "The Paris of the West”.

The City owes much of its special character to its isolation at the tip of a hill-studded peninsula. The city’s many hills, and the bay and the ocean that surround it have a great influence on how San Francisco developed.

There are more than 50 hills within city limits. Some neighborhoods are named after the hill on which they are situated, including Nob Hill, Russian Hill, and Potrero Hill. San Francisco's shoreline has grown beyond its natural limits. Entire neighborhoods such as the Marina, Mission Bay, and Hunter’s Point, as well as large sections of the Embarcadero, sit on areas of landfill.

Climate

San Francisco's climate is generally characterized by moist mild winters and dry summers with the coolest daily mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures for June, July, and August among major U.S. cities. Its weather is strongly influenced by the cool currents of the Pacific Ocean, which moderate temperature swings produce a remarkably mild year-round climate with little seasonal temperature variation. Fog is a regular feature of San Francisco summers but is less pronounced in eastern neighborhoods and during the late summer and early fall, which is the warmest time of the year. Because of its sharp topography and maritime influences, San Francisco exhibits a multitude of distinct microclimates. The high hills in the geographic center of the city are responsible for a 20% variance in annual rainfall between different parts of the city.

History

Starting around 10,000 BC, the ocean came to today’s level and surrounded what is now San Francisco on three sides. Between 5,000 to 10,000 years ago, the Bay Area’s first human inhabitants were Indians, comprising of the four distinct tribes: the Coast Miwoks, the Wintun, the Yokuts, and the Costanoans or Ohlone. San Francisco at that time was primarily sand dunes.

Despite the fact that starting from the mid-16th century Spanish explorers started navigating along California coast, San Francisco remained undiscovered until 1769 due to its unique geographic location and weather conditions. Ironically, it was first sighted during an overland expedition in the area.

The city that later became known as San Francisco was founded on June 29, 1776 when colonists from Spain celebrated a mass near present-day Mission Dolores. At that time, it was a territory of the Spanish empire (along with the rest of California). In 1821 California became a Mexican territory once Mexico declared its independence from Spain. The San Francisco Bay Area was then nothing more than a backwater at the northern end of the new republic of Mexico.

On July 9, 1846, during Mexican-American war, American naval forces led by Captain John B. Montgomery, raised the American flag over the main plaza of the city and claimed San Francisco for the United States. On January 23, 1847 the city obtained its current name - until then it was known as “Yerba Buena”.

The discovery of gold in early 1848 and the subsequent California Gold Rush of 1849 brought rapid growth, making San Francisco the largest city on the West Coast at the time. The promise of great riches was so strong that crews on arriving vessels deserted and rushed off to the gold fields, leaving behind a forest of masts in San Francisco harbor. Gambling, prostitution, and other entertainments flourished. Construction boomed and real estate skyrocketed in value.

Following the Gold Rush, San Francisco continued its rapid development for several reasons. In the 1860s, Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker, Mark Hopkins, and Collis P. Huntington (who later became known as the “Big Four” and became fabulously wealthy) founded the Central Pacific Railroad which connected California to the rest of the country.

The discovery of silver in western Nevada led to other fortunes being amassed in 1860s and 1870s. William Ralston and Darius O. Mills, who founded the Bank of California in 1864, were the initial beneficiaries of what was called the Big Bonanza – the richest silver discovery ever. These bankers were later superseded by a quartet known as the Bonanza or Silver Kings – James Fair, James Flood, John MacKay and William O’Brien.

The wealthy lived in splendor up on the heights but down below near the waterfront the bottom of the heap existed in an area known as Barbary Coast, infamous for being a hangout for criminals of all kinds who profited from prostitution and shanghaiing for the forced sea duty. It was not until 1917, when the Red Light Abatement Act was passed to close down the brothels that this raucous district faded away.

The 19th century left behind two institutions that are still going strong today – the Golden Gate Park (where planting started in 1870) and the cable cars (first launched in 1873) which largely contributed to the City’s expansion through its steep hills and extended 112 miles all over San Francisco by the late 1880s (today, a reduced back system covers 10.5 miles in the northeast corner of town).

A radical change in San Francisco history took place on April 18, 1906 when the city was struck by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in North America. While damage was initially comparatively moderate, the shaking left the city’s water lines broken, this later led to an inability to extinguish a number of small earthquake-related fires. An enormous conflagration resulted and destroyed almost the entire downtown as well South of Market and parts of Mission District areas over the course of three days.

Once the debris was cleared, San Francisco was quickly rebuilt and subsequently hosted a Panama-Pacific International Exhibition in 1915. A new grand plan of the city was proposed by the leading urban planner of the day, Daniel H. Burnham who had drawn his inspiration from the “City Beautiful” movement, known for incorporating its classically inspired public buildings into city plans featuring parks and boulevards.

As the 20th century progressed, San Francisco continued to grow. Despite the Great Depression, both the Golden Gate and Bay Bridge were erected. The decade ended with San Francisco hosting a world’s fair, the Golden Gate International Exposition (more commonly referred to as Treasure Island).

By the time the United States entered into World War II in 1941, San Francisco started its transformation into the highly diverse and open society it has become today. The war brought a huge influx of newcomers to the City as soldiers were drafted to service many military bases in the Bay Area. African Americans came in large numbers from the South to work in defense plants and settled in Japantown / Fillmore areas – replacing the Japanese Americans who were unjustly removed from the neighborhoods on suspicion of being enemy aliens.

After World War II, a counterculture revolution started in North Beach in 1950s, which followed by the flowering of the hippies in Haight-Ashbury in the 1960s. The Haight Ashbury phenomenon left a legacy of increased tolerance: it was one of the influences that led to gains by gays, women, and ethnic minorities during the 1970s and 1980s. Today, San Francisco continues to build an enduring reputation as a city of diversity of all kinds: racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual.

On October 17, 1989, northern California was hit with by a 6.8 earthquake, the biggest since 1906. Amongst top sites of destructions were upper decks of the Bay Bridge and the dramatic damage and fire in the Marina district. The quake severely damaged many of the city's freeways including the Embarcadero Freeway and the Central Freeway but the damaged areas were quickly restored.

The 1990s saw the demolition of the earthquake damaged Embarcadero and Central Freeway, restoring the once blighted Hayes Valley as well as the city's waterfront promenade, the Embarcadero. In 1996, the city elected its first and to date only African American mayor, former Speaker of the California State Assembly, Willie Brown.

During the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, large numbers of entrepreneurs and computer software professionals moved into the City, followed by marketing and sales professionals, and changed the social landscape as once poorer neighborhoods became gentrified. In 2001, the markets crashed, the boom ended, and many left San Francisco.  By 2003, the city's economy had recovered from the dot-com crash thanks to a resurgent international tourist industry and the Web 2.0 boom which saw the creation of many new internet and software start-up companies in the city, attracting white-collar workers, recent University graduates, and young adults from all over the world.   Residential demand as well as rents rose again, and as a result city officials relaxed building height restrictions and zoning codes to construct high-rise residential condominiums in South of Market neighborhood.

San Francisco Today

Today, San Francisco is the cultural, commercial, and business center of Northern California. At approximately 50 square miles, it is the smallest and the most densely populated county in California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York City. It has a diversified service economy, with employment spread across a wide range of professional services, including financial services, tourism, and high technology. San Francisco is also the headquarters of five major banking institutions and various other companies such as Levi Strauss & Co., Gap, Inc., Salesforce.com, Dropbox.com, Reddit, Square, Inc., Airbnb, Twitter, Uber, Mozilla, Craigslist and many others.

The international character that San Francisco has enjoyed since its founding is continued today by large numbers of immigrants from Asia and Latin America. San Francisco has a minority-majority population, as non-Hispanic whites comprise less than half of the population.

Education

The University of California, San Francisco is the sole campus of the University of California system entirely dedicated to graduate education in health and biomedical sciences. It is ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States and operates the UCSF Medical Center, ranking among the top 15 hospitals in the country.

The University of California, Hastings College of the Law, founded in Civic Center in 1878, is the oldest law school in California.

San Francisco State University is part of the California State University and has approximately 30,000 students and awards undergraduate, master's and doctoral degrees in more than 100 disciplines. The City College of San Francisco, with its main facility in the Ingleside district, is one of the largest two-year community colleges in the country.

Founded in 1855, the University of San Francisco, a private Jesuit university located on Lone Mountain, is the oldest institution of higher education in San Francisco and one of the oldest universities established west of the Mississippi River.

Golden Gate University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational university formed in 1901 and located in the Financial District.

With an enrollment of 13,000 students, the Academy of Art University is the largest institute of art and design in the nation.

Founded in 1871, the San Francisco Art Institute is the oldest art school west of the Mississippi.

The California College of the Arts, located north of Potrero Hill, has programs in architecture, fine arts, design, and writing.

The San Francisco Conservatory of Music, the only independent music school on the West Coast, grants degrees in orchestral instruments, chamber music, composition, and conducting.

The California Culinary Academy, associated with the Le Cordon Bleu program, offers programs in the culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, and hospitality and restaurant management.

California Institute of Integral Studies, founded in 1968, offers a variety of graduate programs in its Schools of Professional Psychology & Health, and Consciousness and Transformation.

Cultural Scene Overview

San Francisco's entertainment scene is quite diverse as well. Its War Memorial and Performing Arts Center hosts some of the most enduring performing-arts companies in the U.S. The War Memorial Opera House houses the San Francisco Opera, the second-largest opera company in North America as well as the San Francisco Ballet, while the San Francisco Symphony plays in Davies Symphony Hall. San Francisco also has a large number of theatres and life performance venues. Local theater companies have been noted for risk taking and innovation.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) houses 20th century and contemporary works of art. It moved to its current building in the South of Market neighborhood in 1995 and now attracts more than 600,000 visitors annually. The Palace of the Legion of Honor holds primarily European antiquities and works of art at its Lincoln Park building. The de Young's museum’s collection features American decorative pieces and anthropological holdings from Africa, Oceania and the Americas. The Asian Art Museum displays artifacts from over 6,000 years of history across Asia.

California Academy of Sciences is a natural history museum that also hosts the Morrison Planetarium and Steinhart Aquarium. Located on Pier 15 on the Embarcadero, the Exploratorium is an interactive science museum founded by physicist Frank Oppenheimer in 1969. The Contemporary Jewish Museum is a non-collecting institution that curates and hosts a broad array of exhibitions each year. Two museum ships are moored near Fisherman's Wharf, the SS Jeremiah O’Brien Liberty ship and USS Pampanito submarine. On Nob Hill, the Cable Car Museum is a working museum featuring the cable car power house, which drives the cables, and the car depot.

Parks 

Several of San Francisco's parks and nearly all of its beaches form part of the regional Golden Gate National Recreation Area, one of the most visited units of the National Park Systemin the United States with over 13 million visitors a year.

There are more than 220 parks maintained by the San Francisco Recreation & Parks Department, with Golden Gate Park being the largest and best-known city park, stretching from the center of the city west to the Pacific Ocean. Lake Merced is a fresh-water lake surrounded by parkland near the San Francisco Zoo, a city-owned park that houses more than 250 animal species.

 

The content displayed above was partially derived from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco as well as from the book by Rand Richards: “Historic San Francisco. A Concise History and Guide." 

 

About Kate

As a long-term resident of San Francisco, Kate is well familiar with the city’s past and present. With her professional background and deep knowledge of the local housing market, Kate is in the position to best assist with your real estate needs. Should you be looking for a recommendation on the upcoming cultural or social events and/or if you need a trusted local real estate advisor, ask Kate – San Francisco is her HOME.

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Address: 1801 Lombard Street, San Francisco, CA 94123

Mobile: +1.415.601.0926

Email: ekaterina.stanton@gmail.com

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